Chesterton essay fool

Fr. Martin admits he is not a theologian, but he does not hesitate in insisting the Catechism be changed, remarking: “But, as I say in the book, saying that one of the deepest parts of a person — the part that gives and receives love — is disordered is needlessly hurtful.” Such a statement, frankly, is embarrassing; coming from a priest who belongs to an order once known for its theological rigor and doctrinal fidelity, it is scandalous. However, it is also instructive, for it indicates how poorly Fr. Martin understands the logic of Church teaching and the truth about human nature. Readers would do well to carefully consider the insights provided by Daniel Mattson in his book Why I Don’t Call Myself Gay: How I Reclaimed My Sexual Reality and Found Peace (Ignatius Press, 2017), who points out how a homosexual man, in reading the Catechism’s short section, “hears the Church’s teaching not as an invitation to authentic human fulfillment, but as a rejection of himself and the person he cares about.” Mattson then quotes from Benedict XVI’s 2012 ad limina visit with the . bishop, in which Benedict stated :

It is a populist movement that will go forward and he is only one man. He was the only candidate for president offering this agenda to #MAGA. It was a sign of sanity and law and order. So, the cronies and crooks are trying with help of their mockingbird media to unseat him as president. He isn’t perfect but he is doing what he can to bravely turn this ship away from globalism, Marxism, communism, toward sovereignty we have been known for but have lost. It isn’t easy or quick to undue decades of federal corruption and theft of our tax dollars. He isn’t a saint but he is on the team of sovereignty. If he doesn’t make accomplishments happen as his campaign promised, there are others’ that will run and win with the same agenda. Trump derangement syndrome colors Americans views but in the eyes of others in the western world, such as Poland, he is a hero.

This is an important theme for Kwasniewski. He touches on it in every chapter. The liturgical reform was made for the benefit of “modern” man by academic clerics and liturgy professors with little real knowledge of modern man. (There is a famous story that on seeing an early version of the new Mass, in no less majestic a setting than the Sistine Chapel, the archbishop of Westminster rightly guessed that none of its creators had ever been parish priests.) But the world moves and changes faster than it did in the ’60s, and “modern man” is not what he was back then. Indeed, as a Catholic, I have grave doubts as to whether “modern man” ever existed at all, and so does Kwasniewski:

On the topic of thinking probabiblistically, it seems to me that a lot of people have trouble thinking in terms of distributions. Like if a study finds that group X has some tendency to do something more often than group Y, people will invariably try to refute the study by bringing up some person they know from group Y who does the thing all the time. But almost always the study is just talking about some difference in the mean for group X and group Y, and the two distributions overlap significantly, so you would absolutely expect to find counterexamples (in fact, it would be weird if there weren’t counterexamples). This is basically the ecological fallacy , and it’s always really annoyed me when people commit it. I think that might just be my physics training, though – physics really drills distributions into your brain.

Chesterton essay fool

chesterton essay fool

On the topic of thinking probabiblistically, it seems to me that a lot of people have trouble thinking in terms of distributions. Like if a study finds that group X has some tendency to do something more often than group Y, people will invariably try to refute the study by bringing up some person they know from group Y who does the thing all the time. But almost always the study is just talking about some difference in the mean for group X and group Y, and the two distributions overlap significantly, so you would absolutely expect to find counterexamples (in fact, it would be weird if there weren’t counterexamples). This is basically the ecological fallacy , and it’s always really annoyed me when people commit it. I think that might just be my physics training, though – physics really drills distributions into your brain.

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