Essays defining addiction

I feel like I’m caught in a whirlpool of “ Amusing Ourselves to Death ,” as author  Neil Postman predicted 30 years ago . In the book, Postman contrasts two dystopian visions of the future. George Orwell’s 1984, where power is expressed directly through Big Brother, oppressively restricting people’s freedoms. And Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, where power is expressed indirectly , by saturating people with so many delightful distractions that they can’t see their oppression. Where people “come to adore the technologies that would undo their capacities to think.”

Kathy LaPan:

  • " Why Christianity is exclusive: the only true religion "
  • " Postmodern Relativism vs. Ultimate Truth "

Unity: Anon: " The need for Jewish unity
  Violence, religiously inspired: Jon Brodkin: " While prayer is peaceful, violence is often in name of God " James Peter Jandu: " Jungle Justice and Lynch Mob Mentality. Causes and cures " Rabbi Allen S. Maller: " God's commandment against religious extremism " Vladimir Tomek: " Passages advocating violence and genocide in religious texts "
  Worldview : See Beliefs

Other topics: Anon: " How to dance in the rain: a message of enduring love " Anon: "Requiem For A Dream: The Decline Of American Values" .: " Role playing games and Christianity " Andrew Graham: "Did Jerusalem fall in 586 or 607 BCE?" Rebuttal essay by Doug Mason: " The Bible and the destruction of Jerusalem"

An essential feature of religious experience across many cultures is the intuitive feeling of God's presence. More than any rituals or doctrines, it is this experience that anchors religious faith, yet it has been largely ignored in the scientific literature on religion.

"... [Dr. Wathey's] book delves into the biological origins of this compelling feeling, attributing it to innate neural circuitry that evolved to promote the mother-child bond...[He] argues that evolution has programmed the infant brain to expect the presence of a loving being who responds to the child's needs. As the infant grows into adulthood, this innate feeling is eventually transferred to the realm of religion, where it is reactivated through the symbols, imagery, and rituals of worship. The author interprets our various conceptions of God in biological terms as illusory supernormal stimuli that fill an emotional and cognitive vacuum left over from infancy. 

These insights shed new light on some of the most vexing puzzles of religion, like:

Essays defining addiction

essays defining addiction

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