House of mirth essays

For, if it is true to say that in essence the tragic hero is intent upon claiming his whole due as a personality, and if this struggle must be total and without reservation, then it automatically demonstrates the indestructible will of man to achieve his humanity. The possibility of victory must be there in tragedy. Where pathos rules, where pathos is finally derived, a character has fought a battle he could not possibly have won. The pathetic is achieved when the protagonist is, by virtue of his witlessness, his insensitivity or the very air he gives off, incapable of grappling with a much superior force. Pathos truly is the mode for the pessimist. But tragedy requires a nicer balance between what is possible and what is impossible. And it is curious, although edifying, that the plays we revere, century after century, are the tragedies. In them, and in them alone, lies the belief--optimistic, if you will, in the perfectibility of man. It is time, I think, that we who are without kings, took up this bright thread of our history and followed it to the only place it can possible lead in our time--the heart and spirit of the average man.

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"Thanatopsis" remains a milestone in American literary history. [ citation needed ] It was republished in 1821 as the lead poem of Thanatopsis and Other Poems , which was considered by many to be the first major book of American poetry. Nevertheless, over five years, it earned Bryant only $. [11] Poet and literary critic Thomas Holley Chivers , who often accused other writers of stealing poems, said that the only thing Bryant "ever wrote that may be called Poetry is 'Thanatopsis,' which he stole line for line from the Spanish." [12]

Davies was a fine public speaker—deft, often humorous, and unafraid to be unfashionable. Often asked if he used a computer, Davies said in 1987: "I don't want a word-processor. I process my own words. Helpful people assure me that a word-processor would save me a great deal of time. But I don't want to save time. I want to write the best book I can, and I have whatever time it takes to make that attempt." [ citation needed ] In its obituary, The Times wrote: "Davies encompassed all the great elements of life...His novels combined deep seriousness and psychological inquiry with fantasy and exuberant mirth." [12] He remained close friends with John Kenneth Galbraith , attending Galbraith's eighty-fifth birthday party in Boston in 1993, [13] and became so close a friend and colleague of the American novelist John Irving that Irving gave one of the scripture readings at Davies' funeral in Trinity College, Toronto chapel. He also wrote in support of Salman Rushdie when the latter was threatened by a fatwā from Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran in reaction to supposed anti-Islam expression in his novel The Satanic Verses . [14]

House of mirth essays

house of mirth essays

Davies was a fine public speaker—deft, often humorous, and unafraid to be unfashionable. Often asked if he used a computer, Davies said in 1987: "I don't want a word-processor. I process my own words. Helpful people assure me that a word-processor would save me a great deal of time. But I don't want to save time. I want to write the best book I can, and I have whatever time it takes to make that attempt." [ citation needed ] In its obituary, The Times wrote: "Davies encompassed all the great elements of life...His novels combined deep seriousness and psychological inquiry with fantasy and exuberant mirth." [12] He remained close friends with John Kenneth Galbraith , attending Galbraith's eighty-fifth birthday party in Boston in 1993, [13] and became so close a friend and colleague of the American novelist John Irving that Irving gave one of the scripture readings at Davies' funeral in Trinity College, Toronto chapel. He also wrote in support of Salman Rushdie when the latter was threatened by a fatwā from Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran in reaction to supposed anti-Islam expression in his novel The Satanic Verses . [14]

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